Ms. Rice Makes It Too Easy

October 13, 2007 at 6:23 pm | Posted in America, American politics, Bush Administration, condoleezza rice, Congress, corruption, Russia | Leave a comment

she says, about Russia:

“In any country, if you don’t have countervailing institutions, the power of any one president is problematic for democratic development,” Rice told reporters after meeting with human-rights activists.

“I think there is too much concentration of power in the Kremlin White House. I have told the Russians Americans that. Everybody has doubts about the full independence of the judiciary. There are clearly questions about the independence of the electronic media and there are, I think, questions about the strength of the Duma Congress,” said Rice, referring to the Russian American parliament.

Who disagrees?

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Austria Breaks With the West

August 23, 2007 at 5:57 am | Posted in American politics, Bush Administration, Foreign Policy, Iran, Russia | 3 Comments

Well done, Austria. They are asking the United States to stop recreating the Cold War by setting up a missile shield over Eastern Europe. Bush may say whatever he wants to about this shield being a protection of Europe from Iranian missiles, but really, please, we all know it really is a way to take advantage of the peace with Russia to reposition ourselves against an emerging Russian strength.

Why are many Americans so afraid of the Russians?

Bush Rebukes Putin, Praises Musharraf

June 1, 2007 at 11:08 am | Posted in American politics, Bush Administration, Foreign Policy, George W Bush, neo-conservatives, Osama Bin Laden, Pakistan, Russia, World Events | 1 Comment

Proving yet again how foolish President Bush is on foreign policy, his administration is rebuking Russia’s Putin for the slow move away from democracy and openness.

A top Russia expert at the State Department issued an unusually sharp public criticism on Thursday of Moscow’s behavior under President Vladimir V. Putin, describing the Kremlin as bullying its neighbors while silencing political opponents and suppressing individual rights at home.

The comments, approved by the White House, are the latest volley of criticism between Washington and Moscow in recent days. Although the White House said this week that President Bush would play host to Mr. Putin on July 1 at the Bush family compound in Maine, the speech is likely to add tension at a time when the broader dialogue between Washington and Moscow is already taking the most caustic tones since the collapse of communism.

“We do no one any favors, least of all the Russian people and even their government, by abstaining from speaking out when necessary,” the Russia expert, David Kramer, the deputy assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs, said in a speech Thursday night before the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs.

That’s fine and all, speaking out against totalitarian moves by the Russian president, but…well, why does the administration keep supporting and praising a non-elected military dictator in Pakistan, Mr. Musharraf, who recently sowed more chaos in his country by firing the chief justice who called for more openness in his country?

Does the Bush administration really feel that it is more beneficial to America’s interests to further push the Russians (with their thousands of nuclear warheads) further away from being an ally? Do they really see it as more beneficial to America’s interests to have another arms race with the Russians? Does the Bush administration not see that by supporting Musharraf’s clearly totalitarian, anti-democratic moves as completely undermining the scorn we heap upon the Russians? What is the point of criticizing the Russians for their anti-democratic moves while we fully support a military dictator’s anti-democratic moves? What effect do we think will come of it? Does the Bush administration really think Putin will see anything but threatening rhetoric?

Rebuking the Russians while supporting the Pakistani makes absolutely no sense. I understand the need to prop Mr. Musharraf, with all the extremists (including Bin Laden) in Pakistan’s tribal regions, but that support undermines and discredits all our other talk of democracy elsewhere. If Mr. Musharraf cannot control his country, and more importantly, help us to destroy Al-Qaida, just what purpose does our support of Mr. Musharraf give us? What is it in America’s interest that supporting him is so valuable? Let the Pakistani wolves have his head. He does not deserve our support.

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